Two Separate Lawsuits Filed Over PeopleMover Collision Injuries at The Magic Kingdom

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With a maximum speed of about 7 mph, the Tomorrowland Transit Authority PeopleMover in the Magic Kingdom is quite possibly the slowest omnimover ride in all of Walt Disney World, but for two sets of guests, alleged issues with ride vehicles crashing into each other have caused injuries, and led to subsequent lawsuits.

The Orlando Sentinel reported earlier today that a family from New Jersey had their ride vehicle come to a complete, abrupt stop in the dark Space Mountain portion of the ride:

“After the cart containing the Tregidgo Family came to a stop, it was struck from behind by a trailing cart,” the lawsuit said, which called the PeopleMover “dangerous” and “a concealed trap.”

According to the family’s attorney, the force of the impact didn’t fling them out of their vehicle, but still caused serious injuries, which ultimately led to two orthopedic surgeries that cost more than $175,000 in medical bills. The family’s trip to Walt Disney World took place in June 2015.

Another guest was there on a girls trip back in February 2017, and suffered injuries on the attraction caused by a ride vehicle collision:

The ride had just begun and then unexpectedly stopped about 100 yards from the station, said her Orlando attorney Brian Wilson.

The next tram slammed into Deieso’s cart, according to court documents.

The collision caused injury to her neck and shoulder, eventually requiring surgery to fix problems from a herniated disc in her neck.

Apparently, this isn’t the first time ride vehicle collisions lead to serious injuries:

A pair of sisters from South Florida who were riding with two children sued in 2017 saying they were seriously injured when carts crashed on Jan. 31 2015. The case closed in July after an undisclosed settlement was reached, court records show.

According to court records, the injuries outlined in these lawsuits were never disclosed by Disney, who self-reports all serious injuries sustained in the parks involving 24 hours immediate of hospitalization.